Classics

Classics encompass films that make us laugh, cry and shiver, forget and remember.  For the Fall 2019 season, The Tull Family Theater’s offerings include:

  • Tuesday, Oct. 22, 6:30 p.m. Amadeus, with live music performed in advance of the screening by The Bluff Opera Society, an ensemble formed by a group of 10 students in Duquesne University’s Mary Pappert School of Music.
  • Thursday, Oct. 31, two shows, 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m. late show. Psycho, the iconic Hitchcock thriller.
  • Tuesday, Nov. 5, 6:30 p.m.  The Good, The Bad and The Ugly gave Spaghetti Westerns a new sauce and inspired a generation of filmmakers.
  • Monday, Nov. 11, 7:00 p.m. Forrest Gump, the Tom Hanks Oscar-winning film about the veteran who unwittingly was part of all major events in Baby Boomer history.
  • Tuesday, Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m. Casablanca, a perennial and timeless favorite with Bogart and  Bergman, produced at a time when the outcome of World War II was far from certain.
  • Sunday, Dec. 8, 12:00 p.m. and Tuesday, Dec. 10, 7:30 p.m.  National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation, the quintessential over-the-top celebration of the holiday.
  • Sunday, Dec. 15, 11:30 a.m., and Saturday, Dec. 21, 10:30 a.m. White Christmas, the feel-good film with Bing Crosby, Rosemary Clooney, Danny Kaye and Vera Ellen. Directed by Michael Curtiz–who also brought us Casablanca.
  • Sunday, Dec. 22, 11:30 a.m., and Tuesday, Dec. 24, 11:30 a.m. It’s a Wonderful Life, an affirmation of the impact one person can make, especially in a small town.
  • Sunday, Dec. 29, 12:00 p.m., and Monday, Dec. 30, 12:00 p.m. Monty Python and the Holy Grail, the substrate of comedy since its release 50 years ago, impacting everything from The Simpsons to Saturday Night Live.

Tickets are available online under the Advance Sales tab or at the box office.

Many of the classic films screened at The Tull Family Theater are pictures that have been deemed national cultural treasures, worthy of preservation by the National Film Registry, a part of the Library of Congress.

Every year, members of the public can nominate a film to the Librarian and National Film Preservation Board to be considered as an addition to the registry. Films must be at least 10 years old and “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant.” This includes productions from silent films, home movies and documentaries to blockbusters.

The Theater encourages patrons to have a voice in this film preservation project. An individual may recommend up to 50 titles a year through the online nomination form.